Warning: getimagesize(https://www.hoydallas.com/images/Columnistas/Priscilla_100x110.jpg): failed to open stream: HTTP request failed! HTTP/1.1 404 Not Found in /home/customer/www/hoydallas.com/public_html/libraries/sourcecoast/openGraph.php on line 420
"Remembering my Quince"

"Remembering my Quince"

I had hardly slept the night before and morning couldn't come soon enough. I had been waiting for this day for months, years, actually.  I decided when I was about seven or eight-years-old that I was going to have a day like that one. The church and the dance hall were decorated, my custom-made dress was hanging in my room, my friends had all made plans and all my family members were in town for my special day. That was almost 25 years ago -- the day of my quinceañera.

I remember that day like it was yesterday. My closest girl friends were dressed in shiny floral dresses and the guys were all wearing black tuxedos with a hot pink cummerbund.  It's amazing (now that I look back) how all my family and friends played an important role in making the dreams of a 15-year-old girl come true. The rehearsals, the commitment -- all appreciated now.

These moments of nostalgia of my quinceañera have come about because I'm directing a staged reading of  the play "Miss Quince", written by Cynthia DeCure.

Although my experience was a different one than that of Soledad Jenkins, the main character of "Miss Quince", I know several friends that can relate to her. Soledad decides that she wants to have a quinceañera celebration at the age of 45. This is a play about identity, transformation and forgiveness. 

Silly, ignorant me had previously thought that all women wanted a quinceañera celebration at 15, but later realized that wasn't the case. As we Latinas try to fit in to mainstream culture, sometimes we give things up that celebrate our cultural heritage, such as quinceañeras. I guess I didn't know any different. I didn't realize that I wasn't mainstream.  I was lucky that I didn't feel the pressure to fit in, but I realize that many of my friends did. It's been a journey for them to find their own identity, culture and to forgive themselves. 
 
I love the character of Soledad because I think that many will be able to relate to her.  Sometimes, art can heal or begin the healing process. I know that's one of the reasons why I love art so much. Art gives me hope.
 
If you are wanting to find out what "Miss Quince" is all about, please join me and cast members Vanessa Mercado Taylor, Joanna Osorio, Guadalupe Reveles, Adriana Cabeza and Brit Rayson. The staged reading is part of a national initiative called Passport 30/30, in which Latino theater companies throughout the country are presenting staged readings of plays written by Latino playwrights. The show is this Wednesday at 7 p.m. at the Oak Cliff Cultural Center. The event is free and flan will be served.
 
I invite you to bring any pictures you may have of your quinceañera and if you didn't have one before, it's never too late! Celebrate life. 
 

 

Priscilla Rice is an actor, poet, mother and aspiring samba dancer. She has appeared in several plays at the Latino Cultural Center and helps coordinate a monthly spoken word event at the Oak Cliff Cultural Center. She studied Broadcast Journalism at The University of Texas at Austin and has worked as a radio news/traffic reporter and assignment editor for various television stations. She currently works as an interpreter/translator. She is originally from Crystal City, TX and resides in Dallas with her son, Leo.

I remember that day like it was yesterday. My closest girl friends were dressed in shiny floral dresses and the guys were all wearing black tuxedos with a hot pink cummerbund.  It's amazing (now that I look back) how all my family and friends played an important role in making the dreams of a 15-year-old girl come true. The rehearsals, the commitment -- all appreciated now.

These moments of nostalgia of my quinceañera have come about because I'm directing a staged reading of  the play "Miss Quince", written by Cynthia DeCure.

Although my experience was a different one than that of Soledad Jenkins, the main character of "Miss Quince", I know several friends that can relate to her. Soledad decides that she wants to have a quinceañera celebration at the age of 45. This is a play about identity, transformation and forgiveness. 

Silly, ignorant me had previously thought that all women wanted a quinceañera celebration at 15, but later realized that wasn't the case. As we Latinas try to fit in to mainstream culture, sometimes we give things up that celebrate our cultural heritage, such as quinceañeras. I guess I didn't know any different. I didn't realize that I wasn't mainstream.  I was lucky that I didn't feel the pressure to fit in, but I realize that many of my friends did. It's been a journey for them to find their own identity, culture and to forgive themselves. 
 
I love the character of Soledad because I think that many will be able to relate to her.  Sometimes, art can heal or begin the healing process. I know that's one of the reasons why I love art so much. Art gives me hope.
 
If you are wanting to find out what "Miss Quince" is all about, please join me and cast members Vanessa Mercado Taylor, Joanna Osorio, Guadalupe Reveles, Adriana Cabeza and Brit Rayson. The staged reading is part of a national initiative called Passport 30/30, in which Latino theater companies throughout the country are presenting staged readings of plays written by Latino playwrights. The show is this Wednesday at 7 p.m. at the Oak Cliff Cultural Center. The event is free and flan will be served.
 
I invite you to bring any pictures you may have of your quinceañera and if you didn't have one before, it's never too late! Celebrate life. 
 

 

Priscilla Rice is an actor, poet, mother and aspiring samba dancer. She has appeared in several plays at the Latino Cultural Center and helps coordinate a monthly spoken word event at the Oak Cliff Cultural Center. She studied Broadcast Journalism at The University of Texas at Austin and has worked as a radio news/traffic reporter and assignment editor for various television stations. She currently works as an interpreter/translator. She is originally from Crystal City, TX and resides in Dallas with her son, Leo.