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Reflections... (When we are gone)

Reflections... (When we are gone)

Once we are gone, the only things we leave behind are the memories we created with loved ones. Those were the words that a dear friend of mine shared with me this past week and I've been unable to erase her words from my mind. It's as if my conscience has held on to those words for a reason, because they are important.

Ever since she shared this knowledge, I've been contemplating whether I've created enough memories with loved ones, and if those memories that I've created are good ones. I'm certain that not all of them have been. In those moments when I may have hurt or caused pain, I sincerely hope that the damage was minimal. Of course, it's difficult to tell how much we've hurt someone, because it's impossible to get into someone's heart and head and know exactly how they felt at that moment.

Because I'm one of those persons who expresses how she feels (probably too much, sometimes), I believe in telling my loved ones how much I love them. I say "I love you" often. I say it to family and friends. If we feel love and appreciation for someone, why do we hold it inside? For those that are uncomfortable with words, acts of kindness and even small gestures in every day life can show love.

For example, when I was a child, my mother had breakfast ready for me every morning before I went to school. That's just one of many ways in which she showed me love. My mother uses both -- words and gestures to express love. If you have the courage to express love, do so. Words and actions together are incredibly powerful. Words without the action to back them up seem meaningless, especially when it comes to love.

When we are gone, what will our loved ones remember us by? I don't remember many of the material things that I've been given throughout the years, but I do remember how people have made me feel -- both good and not so good. And that's what I'll remember about them.

I have to confess that I have held on to some Earthly possessions after loved ones have passed away, such as my grandfather's button down shirt. I wear it from time to time. But what I remember most about my grandfather was his smile and the way he always laughed and that I never heard him say a mean thing about anybody. He always treated everyone with kindness and respect and cared for humanity.

I am challenging myself to create more memories with loved ones and to not lose sight of what's truly important -- each other. The trivial things of life can wait. They will be there when we come back from visiting with family and friends. I'm not saying to forget your responsibilities. What I am saying is that life is short and while we're here, we might as well love each other.


Priscilla Rice is an actor, poet, mother and aspiring samba dancer. She has appeared in several plays at the Latino Cultural Center and helps coordinate a monthly spoken word event at the Oak Cliff Cultural Center. She studied Broadcast Journalism at The University of Texas at Austin and has worked as a radio news/traffic reporter and assignment editor for various television stations. She currently works as an interpreter/translator. She is originally from Crystal City, TX and resides in Dallas with her son, Leo.

Ever since she shared this knowledge, I've been contemplating whether I've created enough memories with loved ones, and if those memories that I've created are good ones. I'm certain that not all of them have been. In those moments when I may have hurt or caused pain, I sincerely hope that the damage was minimal. Of course, it's difficult to tell how much we've hurt someone, because it's impossible to get into someone's heart and head and know exactly how they felt at that moment.

Because I'm one of those persons who expresses how she feels (probably too much, sometimes), I believe in telling my loved ones how much I love them. I say "I love you" often. I say it to family and friends. If we feel love and appreciation for someone, why do we hold it inside? For those that are uncomfortable with words, acts of kindness and even small gestures in every day life can show love.

For example, when I was a child, my mother had breakfast ready for me every morning before I went to school. That's just one of many ways in which she showed me love. My mother uses both -- words and gestures to express love. If you have the courage to express love, do so. Words and actions together are incredibly powerful. Words without the action to back them up seem meaningless, especially when it comes to love.

When we are gone, what will our loved ones remember us by? I don't remember many of the material things that I've been given throughout the years, but I do remember how people have made me feel -- both good and not so good. And that's what I'll remember about them.

I have to confess that I have held on to some Earthly possessions after loved ones have passed away, such as my grandfather's button down shirt. I wear it from time to time. But what I remember most about my grandfather was his smile and the way he always laughed and that I never heard him say a mean thing about anybody. He always treated everyone with kindness and respect and cared for humanity.

I am challenging myself to create more memories with loved ones and to not lose sight of what's truly important -- each other. The trivial things of life can wait. They will be there when we come back from visiting with family and friends. I'm not saying to forget your responsibilities. What I am saying is that life is short and while we're here, we might as well love each other.


Priscilla Rice is an actor, poet, mother and aspiring samba dancer. She has appeared in several plays at the Latino Cultural Center and helps coordinate a monthly spoken word event at the Oak Cliff Cultural Center. She studied Broadcast Journalism at The University of Texas at Austin and has worked as a radio news/traffic reporter and assignment editor for various television stations. She currently works as an interpreter/translator. She is originally from Crystal City, TX and resides in Dallas with her son, Leo.