Hispanic PAC of Dallas Endorses Three Dallas ISD Candidates

DALLAS -- The Hispanic PAC of Dallas has endorsed three Dallas ISD candidates (Jaime Resendez, District 4, Marquis Hawkins, District 5 and Isaac Faz, District 7) as the most capable individuals to represent the interests of the local Hispanic community on the Dallas Independent School District Board, announced on Monday.

“Moving our city and school district forward with strong candidates that propel the Hispanic community is paramount,” said Hector Escamilla, Jr., Hispanic PAC of Dallas Vice-President. “The candidates we endorsed demonstrated the most commitment to the advancement of the Hispanic community in Dallas and the equal treatment of all citizens.”

Jaime Resendez, a Dallas native, served eight years in the U.S. Army as an engineer, including a yearlong tour of duty in Baghdad, Iraq. He went on to earn an Associate Degree at Eastfield Community College, a Bachelor of Arts and Sciences Degree from the University of North Texas (Dallas Campus), and then a J.D. degree from The University of Texas School of Law. He has a long history of community involvement. 

Marquis Hawkins, who grew up in the Metroplex, has continually worked to close the opportunity gap for those without access to the best education opportunities. A graduate of Morehouse College and Cornell University, he served as a social studies teacher for two years. He has served actively as a mentor in Big Brothers Big Sisters, Reading Partner at Elisha M. Pease Elementary and Roger Q. Mills Elementary, and a volunteer at many Dallas ISD schools. 

The son of Mexican immigrants, Isaac Faz, was born in Dallas, raised in Oak Cliff, and attended Dallas ISD schools.Currently Isaac serves as Vice President of the Dallas Hispanic Bar Association and is a past fellow of Leadership ISD and the State Bar of Texas Leadership SBOT. Isaac attended Dallas County Community College, received his Bachelors of Science from the University of Texas at Austin, and his Juris Doctorate from Thurgood Marshall School of Law in Houston. In 2015, Isaac was Co-Chair of the Future Facilities Task Force (FFTF), which submitted a $1.6 billion proposal – the largest in DISD history – that was overwhelming passed by the voters in November 2015.

“Moving our city and school district forward with strong candidates that propel the Hispanic community is paramount,” said Hector Escamilla, Jr., Hispanic PAC of Dallas Vice-President. “The candidates we endorsed demonstrated the most commitment to the advancement of the Hispanic community in Dallas and the equal treatment of all citizens.”

Jaime Resendez, a Dallas native, served eight years in the U.S. Army as an engineer, including a yearlong tour of duty in Baghdad, Iraq. He went on to earn an Associate Degree at Eastfield Community College, a Bachelor of Arts and Sciences Degree from the University of North Texas (Dallas Campus), and then a J.D. degree from The University of Texas School of Law. He has a long history of community involvement. 

Marquis Hawkins, who grew up in the Metroplex, has continually worked to close the opportunity gap for those without access to the best education opportunities. A graduate of Morehouse College and Cornell University, he served as a social studies teacher for two years. He has served actively as a mentor in Big Brothers Big Sisters, Reading Partner at Elisha M. Pease Elementary and Roger Q. Mills Elementary, and a volunteer at many Dallas ISD schools. 

The son of Mexican immigrants, Isaac Faz, was born in Dallas, raised in Oak Cliff, and attended Dallas ISD schools.Currently Isaac serves as Vice President of the Dallas Hispanic Bar Association and is a past fellow of Leadership ISD and the State Bar of Texas Leadership SBOT. Isaac attended Dallas County Community College, received his Bachelors of Science from the University of Texas at Austin, and his Juris Doctorate from Thurgood Marshall School of Law in Houston. In 2015, Isaac was Co-Chair of the Future Facilities Task Force (FFTF), which submitted a $1.6 billion proposal – the largest in DISD history – that was overwhelming passed by the voters in November 2015.