Dallas City Hall

"Taking Action for Our Health": Un sitio bilingüe para los latinos

Taking Action For Our Health, a relatevely new website,  "is a social care network that connects people and programs, making it easier for people to find the social services they need in their community".

Dallas ISD

The goal of the Taking Action for Our Health initiative is to get Latinos "moving" and taking action to improve their lives, their loved ones, and their communities. By being preventive and vigilant about their health, Hispanics can “help build a more equitable and healthier country,” says Anthem, Inc, who in a unique collaboration joined the Beckman Research  Institute of Hope and Pfizer to promote this bilingual space.

This online resource focuses on four main areas: cancer screenings, heart health, emotional health, and prediabetes. The website includes a community program called “Café y Chocolate”, and basically encourages people to take action: “Learn, act, monitor your progress, and help others do the same” whether you recognize yourself as a daughter, hermana, brother, husband, esposa, or a protective grandmother (abuelita).

The coronavirus pandemic has unleashed serious and incredible consequences in many areas of daily life among Latinos, affecting the mental, physical and financial health within the community.

In 2020, for example, in the United States the sale of cigarettes rose for the first time in 20 years. The number of cigarettes sold to wholesalers and retailers nationwide increased from 202.9 billion in 2019 to 203.7 billion in 2020, according to government data.

Unfortunately, it is also estimated that at least 50% of Latinos will suffer from Type 2 diabetes at some point in their lives, due in part to lower income, less access to education, less access to health care and family history.

Dallas ISD

The goal of the Taking Action for Our Health initiative is to get Latinos "moving" and taking action to improve their lives, their loved ones, and their communities. By being preventive and vigilant about their health, Hispanics can “help build a more equitable and healthier country,” says Anthem, Inc, who in a unique collaboration joined the Beckman Research  Institute of Hope and Pfizer to promote this bilingual space.

This online resource focuses on four main areas: cancer screenings, heart health, emotional health, and prediabetes. The website includes a community program called “Café y Chocolate”, and basically encourages people to take action: “Learn, act, monitor your progress, and help others do the same” whether you recognize yourself as a daughter, hermana, brother, husband, esposa, or a protective grandmother (abuelita).

The coronavirus pandemic has unleashed serious and incredible consequences in many areas of daily life among Latinos, affecting the mental, physical and financial health within the community.

In 2020, for example, in the United States the sale of cigarettes rose for the first time in 20 years. The number of cigarettes sold to wholesalers and retailers nationwide increased from 202.9 billion in 2019 to 203.7 billion in 2020, according to government data.

Unfortunately, it is also estimated that at least 50% of Latinos will suffer from Type 2 diabetes at some point in their lives, due in part to lower income, less access to education, less access to health care and family history.